Who Was Samuel Adams?
 
Who Was Samuel Adams?

Today, the name Sam Adams is associated with the Boston Beer Company. How did a
statesman's name become attached to lager, and how did the real Sam Adams become
famous?

Actually, the Sam Adams recipe wasn't developed until long after Samuel Adams'
lifetime. A Missouri brewer named Louis Koch developed the formula in 1860. Until
Prohibition, the brew was marketed as Louis Koch Lager. The brand returned to store
shelves after Prohibition, but a new name was eventually given in 1985. That year, on
Patriot's Day, the beer was entered into the Great American Beer Festival. The name
"Sam Adams" was fitting for the festival's recreation of a revolutionary war scene, and
the lager soared in popularity.

Samuel Adams was born to a brewing family in Colonial America. He was raised in
Boston and had long been concerned with fairness and justice in government. Decades
before Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence in 1776, Adams
penned a school paper that developed similar ideas about freedom; he'd been studying
the theories of John Locke while at Harvard College.

In the 1740s, when Adams returned to Boston to work for his father, the two men
encountered problems with the British government. The Governor of Massachusetts, who
was appointed by the Crown, fought the Adams family for their home and land.
Sufficiently fired up, Samuel became a populist leader. He served as a clerk in the
colonial legislature, and when not at work he put his education and energy to use
convincing other colonists of their right to fair representation. He presented these ideas at
democratic town meetings and sometimes led discussions over pints of lager at Boston
taverns. His followers became the Country Party.

Of course, it was tea and not beer that instigated Adams' most famous activity. The
Country Party became more active throughout the 1760s and 1770s as the British
government imposed additional taxes on the colonists. In 1773, they formed a subgroup -
the militant "Sons of Liberty" -- and planned a resistance known as the Boston Tea Party.

The colonists objected to the British government's arrangement with the East India
Company. The government would now permit the East India Company to supply tea to
retailers directly. This made tea more expensive by tightening controls on tea smuggling,
establishing the company's tea monopoly, and eliminating colonial wholesalers. Samuel
called upon the Sons of Liberty. One December night in 1773, they disguised themselves
as members of the Mohawk tribe and boarded several docked tea ships. They overturned
the incoming tea shipment right into the Boston harbor. This famous "Boston Tea Party"
ensured that colonists would not pay a tea tax!

Samuel wanted to expand his work for colonial justice beyond his hometown. In 1774 he
brought his case for independence to his cousin, John Adams, and a wealthy merchant
named John Hancock. With their assistance, Samuel convened the Continental Congress,
a meeting for representatives of various colonies to discuss their problems with the
British Parliament. Two years later, the Continental Congress met again to adopt the
Declaration of Independence. Samuel signed the document on July 4, 1776.

Following this accomplishment and the ensuing war, Adams served in the Massachusetts
State Senate. He then held the post of Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts until 1793,
and he was elected Governor of the state in 1794. Adams passed away in Boston at the
age of 83, leaving a lifetime of freedom fights as his legacy.
Samuel Adam's strong belief in independence and his ability to rally support for freedom
earned him the nickname "Father of the American Revolution". It's no wonder his name
was lent to a Boston beer on Patriot's Day. Cheers!
PPPPP
(word count 614)

Search
Recommended Resources
Causes of US Involvement in World War II Following World War I, the United States adopted an isolationist stance. Starting ...
read more

Chinese Immigrants and the Iron Road On a bright May day in 1869, railroad workers, businessmen, and government officials gathered ...
read more

Deep Throat and his Legacy In the pre-dawn hours of June 17, 1972, a security guard called police officers to ...
read more

Economic Causes of the American Revolution What brought about the American Revolution? Like most military conflicts, the Revolution was spurred ...
read more

Equality and the Seneca Falls Convention "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created ...
read more

France and the American Revolution In March of 2003, after France opposed a UN invasion of Iraq, two US Republicans ...
read more

General Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad Araminta Ross, later named Harriet Tubman, was born into slavery circa 1820. She ...
read more

George Washington's Federal Government When a modern US president travels, he or she expects the electorate to cover the cost. ...
read more

Gold Fever and the Growth of California One January day in 1848, a man named James Marshall was inspecting a ...
read more

Jackie Robinson and the Integration of US Baseball In 1945, when Jackie Robinson batted .387 for the Negro League Kansas ...
read more

Japanese Internment Camps in the United States Just off of US Highway 395, at the foot of the Sierra Nevada ...
read more

John O'Sullivan and America's Manifest Destiny When leaders wish to conquer foreign lands, they invariably put forth a list of ...
read more

John Scopes and the Teaching of Evolution In the mid-1920s, many young Americans flaunted long-established Victorian culture. Women were voting, ...
read more

Lowell Factory Girls of the 19th Century During the first half of the 1800s, girls and young women from throughout ...
read more

Navajo Windtalkers: America's Secret Weapon When the United States fought World War II, they ran the constant risk of information ...
read more

Prayer, Persecution, and Portsmouth: A Story of Colonist Anne Hutchinson Anne Hutchinson (1591-1643) is a key figure in the history ...
read more

Prohibition and its Repeal When clocks struck midnight on January 16, 1920, the United States officially went dry. The age ...
read more

The Botched Bay of Pigs Invasion In the wee morning hours of April 17, 1961, nearly fifteen hundred Cuban exiles ...
read more

The Frenzy of Salem Witch Trials Over the summer of 1692, members of the Massachusetts Bay Colony became caught up ...
read more

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere "Listen children and you shall hear/The midnight ride of Paul Revere." So begins a ...
read more

The Rise and Fall of Jamestown In the early 1600s, an English preacher named Alexander Whitaker described a land where ...
read more

The Scandalous Typhoid Mary In 1907, Mary Mallon was working as a household cook when an inspector named George Soper ...
read more

The US Presidency and Tecumseh's Curse In 1840, General William Henry Harrison easily won the US presidency. He was celebrated ...
read more

What Caused the Great Depression? The Great Depression was a global phenomenon that significantly changed the course of history. In ...
read more

Who Was Samuel Adams? Today, the name Sam Adams is associated with the Boston Beer Company. How did a statesman's ...
read more

Main Menu
Home
Sitemap



Articles
Causes of US Involvement in World War II

Chinese Immigrants and the Iron Road

Deep Throat and his Legacy

Economic Causes of the American Revolution

Equality and the Seneca Falls Convention

France and the American Revolution

General Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad

George Washington's Federal Government

Gold Fever and the Growth of California

Jackie Robinson and the Integration of US Baseball

Japanese Internment Camps in the United States

John O'Sullivan and America's Manifest Destiny

John Scopes and the Teaching of Evolution

Lowell Factory Girls of the 19th Century

Navajo Windtalkers: America's Secret Weapon

Prayer, Persecution, and Portsmouth: A Story of Colonist Anne Hutchinson

Prohibition and its Repeal

The Botched Bay of Pigs Invasion

The Frenzy of Salem Witch Trials

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

The Rise and Fall of Jamestown

The Scandalous Typhoid Mary

The US Presidency and Tecumseh's Curse

What Caused the Great Depression?

Who Was Samuel Adams?

 

Disclaimer: The Publisher has strived to be as accurate and complete as possible in the creation of this website, notwithstanding the fact that he does not warrant or represent at any time that the contents within are accurate due to the rapidly changing nature of the Internet.

This site is a common sense guide to Who Was Samuel Adams?. In practical advice websites, like anything else in life, there are no guarantees of income made. Readers are cautioned to reply on their own judgment about their individual circumstances to act accordingly.

This site is not intended for use as a source of legal, business, accounting or financial advice. All readers are advised to seek services of competent professionals in legal, business, accounting, and finance field.

Any perceived slights of specific people or organizations are unintentional.

Home| Sitemap|Budget Hosting

7.my © All Rights Reserved.